EKAN ZEN STUDY CENTER

Inspiring the Discovery of a Wiser World

SERVICE & INCLUSIVITY
How Chaplaincy Shows us our True Selves

1.00
shutterstock_97304843_opt.jpg shutterstock_97304834_opt.jpg

SERVICE & INCLUSIVITY
How Chaplaincy Shows us our True Selves

1.00

The role of the chaplain is to provide support for others to find the expression of their true nature, amidst the profound changes of a human life. Chaplains frame intimate conversation in ways that elicit an authentic response, enabling everyone in the encounter to undergo personal exploration, creating a sense of connection and safety. Grounded in the teachings of impermanence and interconnection, Zen Buddhist chaplains are equipped to elicit this kind of deep investigation, while allowing it to be the individual's unique view. Inquiry is built into the Zen tradition.

However, in order to do their work, chaplains must possess some spiritual authority. From where does this authority arise? Certainly not from God or from institutional authority, which in Buddhism in America is typically weak compared to the Abrahamic traditions. In the case of the Buddhist chaplain, the foundation of authority comes from insight, from clear seeing into the nature of experience, as it applies to everyone, to themselves, and to the singular individual with whom they are working. And it is practice that develops this clear seeing.

Interested in more on this topic? Visit buddhistchaplains.org

 

Add To Cart

The role of the chaplain is to provide support for others to find the expression of their true nature, amidst the profound changes of a human life. Chaplains frame intimate conversation in ways that elicit an authentic response, enabling everyone in the encounter to undergo personal exploration, creating a sense of connection and safety. Grounded in the teachings of impermanence and interconnection, Zen Buddhist chaplains are equipped to elicit this kind of deep investigation, while allowing it to be the individual's unique view. Inquiry is built into the Zen tradition.

However, in order to do their work, chaplains must possess some spiritual authority. From where does this authority arise? Certainly not from God or from institutional authority, which in Buddhism in America is typically weak compared to the Abrahamic traditions. In the case of the Buddhist chaplain, the foundation of authority comes from insight, from clear seeing into the nature of experience, as it applies to everyone, to themselves, and to the singular individual with whom they are working. And it is practice that develops this clear seeing.

Interested in more on this topic? Visit buddhistchaplains.org